THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF MISA(3): THE GENERAL STATES OF FASHION DESIGN SCHOOLS IN ITALY, TALENT SCOUTING AWARDS & PLATFORMS FOR EMERGING CREATIVITY

Alessandra Vaccari, Maria Bonifacic, Paolo Meroni, and Lupo Lanzara, photo by N
Alessandra Vaccari, Maria Bonifacic, Paolo Meroni, and Lupo Lanzara, photo by N

The second part the Misa’s International Conference was held in Venice at the Terminal San Basilio, area which hosted also Venezia CulT, the European Saloon of Culture and a display of creativity and craftsmanship in the realm of design and fashion design coming from Italy and Europe. The first part of conference was focused on the “General States of fashion design schools in Italy”, which was moderated by the professor of Milan Bocconi University Elisabetta Merlo and featured the nice Sara Azzone (from Milan IED),  the brilliant Alessandra Vaccari and Maria Bonifacic (from the Iuav University of Venice), Alberto Bonisoli (Piattaforma Sistema Formativo Moda), Giovanni Maria Conti (from the Milan Politecnico), Andrea Lupo Lanzara (from the Rome Costume & Fashion Academy), Linda Loppa (from the Florence Polimoda), Carla Lunghi (from the Milano Fashion Institute), Paolo Meroni (from the Milan Marangoni Institute), Nicoletta Marozzi (from the Milan NABA), Patrizia Ranzo (from the Naples Second University of the Studies), Salvo Testa (from the Milan Bocconi University), Barbara Trebitsch (from the Milan Domus Academy) along with Paola Colaiacomo (from the Misa Directive Council) and Mario Boselli (the President of National Chamber of Italian Fashion). It has been an intense morning, considering the number of panelists and their speeches that depicted a successful consciousness along with a status quo. It was the first time all of the Italian fashion schools were together to dialogue and talk about. Thus it’s a bright evidence of how much it needs the existence of an Italian Association for Fashion Studies in order to act and encourage the communication and synergies between different systems concerning fashion.

The slide show of Iuav University under the sign of sharing, a lifestyle, photo by N
The slide show of Iuav University under the sign of sharing, a lifestyle, photo by N
me during the morning talk
me during the morning talk

It has been the first chapter of a new experience, thus the background brought and showcased by the panelists except some exceptions that confirmed the rule, was focused on the history of the single fashion schools, enriched by a list of numbers, seats and other catchy informations that are easily available on their websites. When Gitte Jonsddatter, the co-founder of MUUSE platform who was sat down close to me, not speaking Italian, asked me what they were telling about, I just answered: “don’t worry if you don’t understand, it’s just a series of websites talking and introducing themselves, slogans, it’s a leitmotiv of Italy to talk by using slogans, inside out the Parliament”. The idea of facing with different experiences, considering a new approach in the teaching and learning – resulting from the needs that arise from contemporary times, new media, their continuous flux of informations giving the chance of being informed quickly and at the same time increasing the lack of attention and superficiality in getting informations and making them leave sediment – was extremely out of context. I am sure the following chapter of this bright experience it will feature that, maybe it will happen during the forthcoming conferences, as it takes time and a hard work to renew and enrich the background of fashion insiders and make them dialogue, considering the contemporary status quo. Thus I said to Mario Lupano during a short break, who has been my spiritual point of reference during these days, celebrating his ideas I share as well as his dandy fashion for expressing them. In fact he emphasized the issue of numbers and students which didn’t prove the work of a school and the ideas connected to that.

Lupo Lanzara and Sara Azzone, photo by N
Lupo Lanzara and Sara Azzone, photo by N

The issue was the system of values, ideas connected to the teaching. It’s all about sharing, love or rather passion, the passion to create a project as fashion is a designing work, a connection of different concepts, techniques turning the matter into an object as well as an immaterial value focused on the matter as container of the spirit of folks in a certain time and a place and it lives beyond time. This core was showcased by the two exceptions that confirmed the rule, Alessandra Vaccari along with Maria Bonifacic and Lupo Lanzara, witting the experience of a public fashion school and another being private, the Iuav University of Venice and the Rome Costume and Fashion Academy. Alessandra Vaccari and Maria Bonifacic of whose speech was enriched by an eloquent slide-show, talked about the glocal (global and local) approach of Iuav, celebrating an area, the Veneto, which is a renowned fashion district as well as an international approach in teaching, the internationality of its professors and visiting professors, based on ideas as sharing, encouraging “to reflect in a craftsman way”, the “learned in Italia” or rather “what does in means to make fashion in Italy”, promoting “the localism for being abroad”. I also appreciated the simplicity and modesty of Lupo Lanzara who clearly explained he didn’t documented via slide-show the numbers of enrolled students and the other main features of Academy. It’s a family matter or rather a family management, being this celebrated school founded by her granny, the brilliant and iconic Rosana Pistolese and headed by her mother Fiamma Lanzara, he told focusing on its most peculiar element: “it joins fashion with the costume, the society, meant as culture, as fashion is culture”, element emphasized and developed “by a theoric study in order to give shape to the identity of young people who need to be guided, grown up and trained”. Later Mario Boselli told about the new changes of the Institution he represents telling about the National Chamber of Italian Fashion does a lot for emerging creativity, but it lacks an efficient communication making know what it makes. This has been the answer to my question on the work made by this institution for emerging creativity, which considered also the experience of the travelling show-rooms during the fashion weeks, a project made by the British Fashion Council, as an eventual idea to develop also in Italy.

photo by N
photo by N
Silvano Arnoldo visiting the area featuring Origin, photo by N
Silvano Arnoldo visiting the area featuring Origin, photo by N
Origin, photo by N
Origin, photo by N

After the end of first part of talk I visited the Venezia CullT’ s Pavillion along with my friend Silvano Arnoldo (the bright fashion designer of brand of accessories Arnoldo Battois), enjoying the showcase of Origin (passion and beliefs) the innovative fashion trade show event created by Fiera di Vicenza and Not Just a Label which will be held from 8th to 11th May 2014 in Vicenza, the textiles created by the Netherlander Claudy Jongstra, documented in “Wedding”, a little book given to me telling about her passion for felt and her work making concrete a bright craftsmanship celebrating the nature, giving rise to art installation and warm wraps for women. Clothing, textiles as well as furniture featured in this exhibition: the funny chair by Atanor and the catchy furniture by Kitchen, office, bathroom.

Silvano Arnoldo's hand touching the textile made by Claudy Jongstra, photo by N
Silvano Arnoldo’s hand touching the textile made by Claudy Jongstra, photo by N
Claudy Jongstra, photo by N
Claudy Jongstra, photo by N
Atanor, photo by N
Atanor, photo by N

The afternoon session of conference on the “Awards system and platforms for talents: experiences comparing with themselves” has brightly moderated under the sign of detail, deepness of contents and lightness by Andrea Batilla, the creator of magazine Pizza Digitale and featured as panelists Antonio Cristaudo (Pitti Italics), Veronica Dall’ Osso (Mittelmoda), Adriano Franchi (Who Is On Next?, format created by Altaroma), Barbara Franchin (ITS, International Talent Support), Gitte Jonsdatter (MUUSE), Sara Maino (Vogue Talents), Giulia Pirovano (National Chamber of Italian Fashion), Cristiano Seganfreddo (Associazione Premio Marzotto of whose awards for the best start-ups will be given today during the event “Wideband, the Orchestra for Italian innovation” which is held in Valdagno, close to Vicenza), Stefan Siegel and Patrizia Calefato. It was an interesting round table which presented different realities, national and transnational ones, talent-scouting awards as ITS and Mittelmoda created in Trieste, WION ideated by Altaroma in collaboration with Vogue Italia, platform joining three important cities connected to fashion, Rome, Florence and Milan, Pitti Italics, format included in the Florentine fashion tradeshow event Pitti, the experience of National Chamber of Italian fashion with its three projects, Nude, Next Generation and Incubator, the work of mainstream media as Vogue Italia, curating Vogue Talents, special supplement of renowned magazine and it’s also an exhibition event presenting the emerging creativity which is usually held during the Milan Fashion Week. It completes this overview on the support of talents the bright work made by MUUSE, connecting directly the creative with the clients, eliminating the necessary contacts with showrooms and buyers, giving to him the opportunity to save costs and giving the chance to the purchaser to create a ready to wear garment having the sartorialism of a haute couture product.

Maria Luisa Frisa presenting the afternoon session of conference along with Antonio Cristaudo, Barbara Franchin, Sara Maino and Adriano Franchi, photo by N
Maria Luisa Frisa presenting the afternoon session of conference along with Antonio Cristaudo, Barbara Franchin, Sara Maino and Adriano Franchi and the moderator of conference Andrea Batilla, photo by N

The same mood and also something more features in the platform created by Stefan Siegel, Not Just a Label, featuring an online boutique, being a container of culture and information on fashion, emerging creativity and lifestyle, promoting initiatives under the sign of fashion culture as workshops including the creative it supports and other smashing initiatives. The more recent is Origin(passion and beliefs), a new concept of fashion tradeshow event connecting the creatives with the companies, producers (about which I will tell about more during the forthcoming times). The consciousness arising from this conference is the existence of a lot of work done inside out Italy, but it seems like a constellation of little, big stars shining in the immense sky, where everyone is far away from the other. The issue is in the fact this laudable work has made by systems that are closed, systems that communicate less or nothing between themselves. This was the Cristiano Seganfreddo’s thought – I fully share -, the brilliant director of Associazione Progetto Marzotto which awards with a prize amounting to 800,000 Euros the 19 best Italian start-ups. Considering the criticality of territory, he asserted: “the systems are closed, it lacks a wideband going everywhere, it has to be activated and developed”. That could be a smart way to do more (without being heroes). This new way needs a new way of thinking, as ideas turn into facts, actions, things and situations, thus it’s very important to support initiatives like this conference and the work by Misa, thus let’s join with me, dear FBFers!

LA PRIMA CONFERENZA INTERNAZIONALE DI MISA(3): GLI STATI GENERALI DELLE SCUOLE DI DESIGN DELLA MODA IN ITALIA, I CONCORSI & LE PIATTAFORME PER LA CREATIVITÀ EMERGENTE

The slide show of Iuav University under the sign of loving, photo by N
The slide show of Iuav University under the sign of loving, photo by N

La seconda parte della Conferenza Internazionale di Misa si è tenuta a Venezia presso il Terminal San Basilio, area  che ha ospitato anche Venezia CulT, il Salone Europeo della Cultura e una esposizione di creatività ed artigianalità nell’ ambito del design e della moda proveniente dall’ Italia e dall’ Europa. La prima parte della conferenza è stata incentrata sugli “Stati generali delle scuole di design della moda in Italia” che è stata moderata dalla docente della Università Bocconi di Milano Elisabetta Merlo e di cui sono stati protagonisti la simpatica Sara Azzone (dello IED di Milano), la brillante Alessandra Vaccari e Maria Bonifacic (dell’ Università Iuav di Venezia), Alberto Bonisoli (Piattaforma Sistema Formativo Moda), Giovanni Maria Conti (del Politecnico di Milano), Andrea Lupo Lanzara (dell’ Accademia di Costume & Moda di Roma), Linda Loppa (del Polimoda di Firenze), Carla Lunghi (del Milano Fashion Institute), Paolo Meroni (dell’ Istituto Marangoni di Milano), Nicoletta Marozzi (della NABA di Milano), Patrizia Ranzo (della Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli), Salvo Testa ( della Università Bocconi di Milano), Barbara Trebitsch (della Domus Academy di Milano) insieme a Paola Colaiacomo (del Consiglio Direttivo del Misa) e Mario Boselli (il Presidente della Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana). È stata un’ intensa mattinata, considerando il numero dei relatori e i loro discorsi che hanno dipinto una felice consapevolezza unitamente a uno status quo. Era la prima volta che tutte le scuole di moda italiane erano insieme per dialogare e parlare. Pertanto ciò è una dimostrazione lampante di quanto sia necessaria l’ esistenza di una Associazione Italiana per gli Studi di Moda al fine di agire ed incoraggiare la comunicazione e le sinergie tra diversi sistemi afferenti la moda.

Mario Boselli answering to my question, photo by N
Mario Boselli answering to my question, photo by N

É stato il primo capitolo di una nuova storia, pertanto il background portato con sé ed illustrato dai relatori, eccetto alcune eccezioni che confermavano la regola, era rivolto sulla storia delle single scuole di moda, arricchito da un elenco di numeri, sedi e altre accattivanti informazioni che sono facilmente reperibili sul loro sito web. Quando Gitte Jonsddatter, la co-fondatrice della piattaforma MUUSE che era seduta vicino a me, non parlando italiano, mi ha chiesto di cosa stessero parlando, le ho risposto: “non preoccuparti se non capisci, è soltanto una serie di siti web che parlano e si presentano, una serie di slogans, un leitmotiv dell’ Italia dentro e fuori il Parlamento, parlare avvalendosi di slogans”. L’ idea di confrontarsi con esperienze diverse, prendendo in considerazione un nuovo approccio nell’ insegnamento e nell’ apprendimento – conseguentemente alle esigenze derivanti dalla contemporaneità, dai nuovi media, dal loro continuo flusso di informazioni che offrono la possibilità di essere informati rapidamente e accrescono al tempo stesso la mancanza di attenzione e la superficialità nell’ acquisizione delle informazioni e nella loro sedimentazione – era del tutto fuori contesto. Son certa che il capitolo successivo di questa esperienza avrà questa problematica quale protagonista, forse è più probabile che ciò avverrà durante le prossime conferenze, poiché richiede tempo e un duro lavoro rinnovare, arricchire il background dei fashion insiders e farli dialogare considerando lo status quo contemporaneo. Così dicevo a Mario Lupano durante una breve pausa, a colui che è stato il mio punto di riferimento spirituale in queste giornate, celebrando le sue idee che condivido come anche il suo piglio dandy nell’ esprimerle. Infatti ha sottolineato la questione dei numeri e degli studenti, la quale non provava l’ opera della scuola e le idee sottese ad essa.

The slide show of Rome Fashion and Costume Academy, photo by N
The slide show of Rome Costume and Fashion Academy, photo by N

La problematica risiedeva nel sistema di valori, idee, legate all’ insegnamento. È una questione di condivisione, amore o meglio passione, la passione per creare un progetto, poiché la moda è un lavoro di progettazione, un’ unione di diversi concetti, tecniche che trasformano la materia in oggetto ed anche un valore immateriale, rivolto alla materia come  involucro dello spirito di un popolo, in un certo tempo e luogo e ciò vive oltre il tempo. Questo nucleo della problematica è stato messo in rilievo dalle due eccezioni che confermavano la regola, Alessandra Vaccari assieme a Maria Bonifacic e Lupo Lanzara, testimoniando l’ esperienza di una scuola di moda pubblica e di un’ altra che è privata, l’ Università Iuav di Venezia e l’ Accademia di Costume e Moda di Roma. Alessandra Vaccari e Maria Bonifacic, il cui intervento era arricchito da un eloquente slide-show, hanno parlato dell’ approccio glocal (globale e locale) della Iuav, celebrando un’ area, il Veneto, rinomato distretto della moda come anche l’ approccio internazionale dell’ insegnamento, l’ internazionalità dei suoi docenti e visiting professors che si basa su idee quali la condivisione, l’ incoraggiamento a “riflettere in modo artigianale”, sul “learned in Italia” o meglio su “ciò che significa fare moda in Italia” e la promozione del “localismo per essere all’ estero”. Ho anche apprezzato la semplicità e modestia di Lupo Lanzara che ha spiegato chiaramente che non avrebbe documentato mediante slide-show i numeri degli studenti iscritti e le altre peculiarità dell’ Accademia. È una questione di famiglia ovvero una gestione familiare, essendo questa celebre scuola stata fondata dalla nonna, la brillante e iconica Rosana Pistolese e guidata dalla madre Fiamma Lanzara, da lui raccontata soffermandosi sull’ elemento più qualificante della scuola: “l’ unione della moda con il costume, inteso come cultura, come società, perché la moda è cultura” enfatizzato e consolidato “in uno studio teorico al fine di dare forma all’ identità dei giovani che hanno bisogno di essere guidati, cresciuti e formati”. A seguire Mario Boselli ha raccontato i nuovi cambiamenti dell’ Istituzione che rappresenta dicendo che la Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana fa tanto per la creatività emergente, ma manca la comunicazione adeguata che renda noto ciò che si fa. Questa è stata la risposta alla mia domanda sul lavoro effettuato da tale Istituzione per sostenere la creatività emergente, che prendeva in considerazione anche l’ esperienza degli show-rooms itineranti durante le fashion weeks, un progetto realizzato dal British Fashion Council, quale eventuale idea da sviluppare anche in Italia.

The video teaser of Origin, photo by N
The video teaser of Origin, photo by N
Origin, photo by N
Origin, photo by N
Origin, photo by N
Origin, photo by N
Silvano Arnoldo and me, photo by N
Silvano Arnoldo and me, photo by N

Subito dopo la conclusione della prima parte della conferenza ho visitato i padiglioni di Venezia CullT con il mio amico Silvano Arnoldo (il brillante fashion designer del brand di accessori Arnoldo Battois) e ho apprezzato l’ esposizione di Origin (passion and beliefs), l’ innovativo evento fieristico creato da Fiera di Vicenza e Not Just a Label che si terrà dall’ 8 all’ 11 maggio 2014 a Vicenza, i tessuti creati dall’ olandese Claudy Jongstra, documentati in “Wedding”, un libretto che mi è stato dato, il quale racconta la sua passione per la lana cotta e il suo lavoro che concretizza una brillante artigianalità, celebra la natura e dà vita a installazioni artistiche e calde stole da donna. Abbigliamento, tessuti e anche componenti d’ arredo sono stati protagonisti dell’ evento espositivo come le divertenti e insolite sedie Atanor e gli accattivanti arredi di Kitchen, office, bathroom.

Claudy Jongstra, photo by N
Claudy Jongstra, photo by N
Kitchen, office, bathroom, photo by N
Kitchen, office, bathroom, photo by N
Kitchen, office, bathroom, photo by N
Kitchen, office, bathroom, photo by N

La sessione pomeridiana della conferenza sul “Sistema dei concorsi e piattaforme per i talenti: esperienze a confronto” è stata magistralmente moderata all’ insegna di dettaglio, profondità di contenuti e leggerezza da Andrea Batilla, il creatore del magazine Pizza Digitale ed ha avuto quali protagonisti nelle vesti di relatori Antonio Cristaudo (Pitti Italics), Veronica Dall’ Osso (Mittelmoda), Adriano Franchi (Who Is On Next?, format creato da Altaroma), Barbara Franchin (ITS, International Talent Support), Gitte Jonsdatter (MUUSE), Sara Maino (Vogue Talents), Giulia Pirovano (Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana), Cristiano Seganfreddo (Associazione Premio Marzotto i cui premi per le migliori start-up sarannno conferiti oggi in occasione dell’ evento “Banda larga, l’ Orchestra dell’ Innovazione italiana”che si terrà a Valdagno, nei dintorni di Vicenza), Stefan Siegel e Patrizia Calefato. È stata una interessante tavola rotonda che ha presentato diverse realtà, nazionali e transnazionali, concorsi di talent-scouting quali ITS e Mittelmoda creati a Trieste, WION consolidato da Altaroma in collaborazione con Vogue Italia, piattaforma che unisce tre importanti città legate alla moda, Roma, Firenze e Milano, Pitti Italics, format incluso nell’ evento fieristico di moda fiorentino Pitti, l’ esperienza della Camera Nazionale della moda italiana con i suoi tre progetti Nude, Next Generation ed Incubator, l’ opera dei media di mainstream come Vogue Italia, che cura Vogue Talents, supplemento speciale del rinomato magazine ed è anche un evento espositivo che presenta la creatività emergente il quale si tiene solitamente durante la fashion week milanese. Completa questa panoramica in materia di supporto dei talenti la brillante opera realizzata da MUUSE che mette direttamente in contatto il creativo con i clienti eliminando i necessitati contatti con gli show-room ed i buyers, offrendogli la possibilità di risparmiare i costi per vendere le proprie collezioni e all’ acquirente di comprare un capo di prêt à porter che abbia la sartorialità di un prodotto di alta moda.

Veronica Dall' Osso, Gitte Jonsddatter, her magic translator and Giulia Pirovano, photo by N
Veronica Dall’ Osso, Gitte Jonsddatter, her magic translator and Giulia Pirovano, photo by N

Il medesimo mood e anche qualcosa in più è protagonista della piattaforma creata da Stefan Siegel, Not Just a Label che include una boutique online, è un contenitore di cultura e informazione in materia di moda, creatività emergente e lifestyle, promuove iniziative all’ insegna della cultura della moda quali workshops con i creativi da essa sostenuti ed altre formidabili iniziative. La più recente è Origin( passion and beliefs), un nuovo concetto di evento fieristico di moda che collega i creativi con le aziende, i produttori (riguardo al quale dirò di più nei tempi a venire). La consapevolezza derivante da questa conferenza è l’ esistenza di una gran lavoro fatto dentro e fuori dall’ Italia per sostenere i talenti emergenti, sembra però una costellazione di piccole grandi stelle che splendono nell’ immensità del cielo, in cui ognuna è distante dall’ altra. Il problema sta nel fatto che questo lodevole lavoro è stato effettuato da sistemi che sono chiusi, sistemi che comunicano poco o nulla tra di loro. Questo era il cuore del pensiero – che condivido in pieno – di Cristiano Seganfreddo, il brillante direttore dell’ Associazione Progetto Marzotto che conferisce premi del valore di 800,000 Euro alle migliori 19 start-up italiane. Prendendo in considerazione la criticità del territorio ha affermato che: “i sistemi sono chiusi, manca una banda larga che vada ovunque, va attivata e strutturata”. Ciò potrebbe essere un modo intelligente di fare di più (senza essere eroi). Questa nuova via richiede un nuovo modo di pensare, poiché le idee di trasformano in fatti, azioni, cose e situazioni. Pertanto è oltremodo importante sostenere iniziative come questa conferenza e l’ opera di Misa, quindi unitevi a me cari FBFers!

Maria Luisa Frisa, Cristiano Seganfreddo and Stefan Siegel, photo by N
Maria Luisa Frisa, Cristiano Seganfreddo and Stefan Siegel, photo by Silvano Arnoldo

www.misa-associazione.org

THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF MISA (1): THE WISDOM OF MARIO LUPANO

Marzia Narduzzi, Rita Airaghi, Lidewij Edelkoort , Angelo Flaccavento, Massimiliano Giornetti, Laura Lusuardi, Matteo Marzotto, Chiara Tagliagambe and Mario Lupano, photo by Silvano Arnoldo
Marzia Narduzzi, Rita Airaghi, Lidewij Edelkoort , Angelo Flaccavento, Massimiliano Giornetti, Laura Lusuardi, Matteo Marzotto, Chiara Tagliagambe and Mario Lupano, photo by Silvano Arnoldo

I recently participated at the first International Conference of Misa, the Italian Association for Fashion Studies headed by the bright Maria Luisa Frisa, at two days event focused on “Models and cultural policies between training and industry” – included in Venezia CulT, the European Saloon of Culture – which was opened in Venice at the Iuav University of Venice, in Palazzo Badoer, Aula Tafuri. The international conference started with the speech of Maria Luisa Frisa who introduced the association she heads as President. It followed the Carla Rey (City of Venice’s Councillor for commerce and productive activities) who celebrated this laudable initiative, involving an important industrial district, Veneto and a city, Venice (concrete proof of human being’s will of power and his and its ability to go beyond limits and create), borrowing the words from Cristiano Seganfreddo (who featured the day after in the second session of conference), in order to emphasize the need to create situations giving rise to start-ups and circuits, open systems communicating between themselves. Later Willie Walters, course leader of BA Fashion at the London Saint Martins College of Art & Design, talked about her experience at the fashion school where she works, making an overview by a slideshow which showcased the history and tradition of Saint Martins as well as how much times are changed, a natural consequence. Then it started the session one of conference: “Creatives” formation: didactic strategies ad relations with the fashion with the fashion industry, which has moderated by the freelance journalist Angelo Flaccavento, featured renowned personas of fashion world as Rita Airaghi (director and general manager of Gianfranco Ferré Foundation), Lidewij Edelkoort (from MOBA, Mode Biënnale Arnhem), Massimiliano Giornetti (creative director of fashion house Salvatore Ferragamo), the brilliant professor of Iuav University of Venice Mario Lupano, Laura Lusuardi (from Max Mara fashion group), Matteo Marzotto (President of CUOA Foundation), Marzia Narduzzi (managing director of Pier Spa), Chiara Tagliagambe (from Lectra) and the professor from Stockholm University – strongly wanted by the brand H&M which supported by donations its rise – Louise Wallenberg of whose I celebrate and share the same point of view considering fashion as culture and focusing on its communication and representation, connected to gender issues. I really appreciated the event as a whole, as well as the speech of Mario Lupano, who gave precious remarks, encouraging to be focused on the core of issue, what fashion training is. I appreciated very much is way of elegantly replying to the outrageous assertion of Laura Lusuardi who was very sorry to tell: “The creativity is very modest in Italy”, thus Max Mara often searches for new talents and collaborations abroad, in fact it worked a lot with the London Royal College of Fashion. Mario immediately asserted “the problem is underdevelopment of fashion system considered as a whole, the need of review of standard methods under the sign of ethic of working team”. Another successful reply has made by him after also the speech of Matteo Marzotto – who told about his experience concerning Valentino and the start-up of Vionnet – emphasizing another need: the school has to create culture instead of orienting culture for satisfying the needs of industries. The industries can choose the students trained by fashion schools considering their own needs, but that is quite different and it’s a very important issue: to preserve the freedom, independence and value of culture, avoid to turn it in something being subordinate to the industry. Another important question he brightly showcased it’s the lack of fashion textile design culture in Italy, a status quo arising from the history. In fact from the late eighteenth century to today textile culture is a matter of competence of textile expert, therefore it’s connected to a training made at the technical professional schools which has no connection to fashion design. As it often happens, it speaks just for speaking or worst for complaining, forgetting or ignoring the history ( acting as intermediary with contemporary times). And that is just one of many matters on fashion that should be rethought and considered under the sign of syncretism, something which evidences the importance of rise of Misa, initiative putting finally together different realms of fashion to dialogue and hopefully build new ways for the Italian fashion system and its culture.

LA PRIMA CONFERENZA INTERNAZIONALE DI MISA (1): LA SAGGEZZA DI MARIO LUPANO

Massimiliano Giornetti, Laura Lusuardi and Matteo Marzotto, photo by Silvano Arnoldo
Massimiliano Giornetti, Laura Lusuardi and Matteo Marzotto, photo by Silvano Arnoldo

Ho recentemente partecipato alla prima Conferenza Internazionale di Misa, l’ Associazione Italiana di Studi di Moda guidata dalla brillante Maria Luisa Frisa, un evento di due giorni dedicato ai “Modelli e politiche culturali tra formazione e industria” – incluso in Venezia CulT, il Salone Europeo della Cultura – che è stata inaugurata a Venezia presso la Università Iuav, nel Palazzo Badoer, Aula Tafuri. La conferenza internazionale è iniziata con il discorso di Maria Luisa Frisa che ha presentato l’ associazione che guida nelle vesti di Presidente. A seguire Carla Rey (l’ Assessore al Commercio e alle attività produttive della città di Venezia) che ha celebrato questa notevole iniziativa, la quale coinvolge un importante distretto industriale, il Veneto e una città, Venezia, (concreta dimostrazione della volontà di potenza dell’ uomo e la sua capacità di superare i limiti e creare), prendendo a prestito le parole di Cristiano Seganfreddo (protagonista il giorno successivo della seconda sessione della conferenza) al fine di sottolineare l’ esigenza di creare situazioni che danno vita a start-up e circuiti, sistemi aperti che comunicano tra di loro. Successivamente Willie Walters, responsabile del corso di Laurea di Moda presso il Saint Martins College of Art & Design di Londra, ha parlato della sua esperienza presso la scuola in cui opera, facendo una panoramica mediante una slide-show che illustrava la storia e tradizione del Saint Martins e anche quanto i tempi siano cambiati, una naturale conseguenza. Dopo si è aperta la prima sessione della conferenza, La formazione dei “Creativi”: strategie didattiche e relazioni con l’ industria della moda che è stata moderata dal giornalista freelance Angelo Flaccavento, di cui sono stati protagonisti rinomati personaggi del mondo della moda quali Rita Airaghi (direttrice e general manager della Fondazione Gianfranco Ferré), Lidewij Edelkoort (di MOBA, Mode Biënnale Arnhem), Massimiliano Giornetti (direttore creativo della casa di moda Salvatore Ferragamo), il brillante docente dell’ Università di Venezia Iuav Mario Lupano, Laura Lusuardi (del gruppo Max Mara), Matteo Marzotto (Presidente della Fondazione CUOA), Marzia Narduzzi (direttore esecutivo di Pier Spa), Chiara Tagliagambe (di Lectra) e la docente della Università di Stoccolma – fortemente voluta dal brand H&M che ha sostenuto mediante donazioni la sua nascita – Louise Wallenberg di cui celebro e condivido il medesimo punto di vista che considera la moda come cultura ed è incentrato sua comunicazione e rappresentazione, legata a questioni di gender. Ho oltremodo apprezzato l’ evento nella sua interezza come anche il discorso di Mario Lupano che ha dato preziose delucidazioni, esortando a restare concentrati sul cuore della questione, su ciò che è la formazione di moda. Ho apprezzato molto il suo modo di replicare elegantemente alla provocatoria affermazione di Laura Lusuardi, la quale ha detto con grande dispiacere che: “la creatività è molto modesta in Italia”, pertanto Max Mara cerca spesso nuovi talenti e collaborazioni all’ estero, infatti ha lavorato molto con il Royal College of Fashion di Londra. Mario ha immediatamente ribattuto, spiegando che “il problema è l’ arretratezza del sistema moda nella sua interezza” e sottolineando la necessità di “rivedere gli standard canonici all’ insegna dell’ etica del working team”. Un’ altra sua felice replica è stata effettuata dopo il discorso di Matteo Marzotto – che ha raccontato la sua esperienza di lavoro con Valentino e la start-up di Vionnet -, sottolineando un’ altra esigenza: la scuola deve creare cultura e non orientare la cultura per soddisfare i bisogni delle industrie. Le industrie possono scegliere gli studenti formati dalle scuole di moda prendendo in considerazione le proprie esigenze, ma ciò è del tutto diverso ed resta una problematica rilevante ovvero preservare la libertà, indipendenza e il valore della cultura, evitando di trasformarlo in qualcosa che sia subordinato all’ industria. Un’ altra questione importante da lui brillantemente esposta è la ragione per cui manca in Italia la cultura di fashion design del tessuto, uno status quo che affonda le sue radici nella storia. Infatti dalla fine del diciottesimo secolo a oggi la cultura del tessuto è una materia di competenza del perito tessile, connessa pertanto a una formazione effettuata presso le scuole professionali e avulsa da ogni legame con il fashion design. Come sovente accade spesso si parla per parlare o peggio per lamentarsi, dimenticando o ignorando la storia (il trait d’ union con la contemporaneità). Questa è soltanto una delle svariate problematiche afferenti la moda che dovrebbero essere ripensate e considerate all’ insegna del sincretismo, qualcosa che dimostra l’ importanza della nascita di Misa, iniziativa che mette finalmente insieme diversi ambiti della moda per dialogare e sperabilmente costruire nuove vie per il sistema italiano della moda e la sua cultura.

A blogger at work, Nally Bellati taking a picture of Lidewij Edelkoort, photo by N(...the one and only during the day before the Iphone's narcolepsy)
A blogger at work, Nally Bellati taking a picture of Lidewij Edelkoort, photo by N(…the one and only pic I took due to the Iphone’s narcolepsy)

www.misa-associazione.org

ARNOLDO & BATTOIS FEATURING IN THE MILAN SPRING UP SHOWROOM

Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014

Arnoldo Battois, smashing brand of accessories created by the Venice fashion designers Silvano Arnoldo and Massimiliano Battois, recently featured in the nice cocktail event which was held at the Milan show room Spring Up (in Via Tortona 37) and coincided with the Milan Fashion Week. A successful chance to enjoy the Spring/Summer 2014 collection of brand: an enchanting synthesis of glamour, refined elegance, experimentation, craftsmanship and lightness evidencing the excellence of Made in Italy.

ARNOLDO & BATTOIS PROTAGONISTI DELLO SHOWROOM DI MILANO SPRING UP

Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014

Arnoldo Battois, formidabile brand di accessori creato dai fashion designers di Venezia Silvano Arnoldo e Massimiliano Battois, sono stati recentemente protagonisti del simpatico cocktail che si è tenuto allo showroom di Milano show room Spring Up (in Via Tortona 37) in concomitanza con la Milan Fashion Week. Una felice occasione per apprezzare la collezione primavera/estate 2014 del brand: una incantevole sintesi di glamour, raffinata eleganza, sperimentazione, artigianalità e leggerezza che dimostra l’ eccellenza del Made in Italy.

Me with a smashing bag by Arnoldo Battois made by using the ancient Japanese obi's fabrics and leather
Me with a smashing bag by Arnoldo Battois made by using the ancient Japanese obi’s fabrics and leather
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Maximilian Linz and me
Maximilian Linz and me
Arnoldo  Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014
Silvano Arnoldo, me and the enchanting bag by Arnoldo Battois
Silvano Arnoldo, me and the enchanting bag by Arnoldo Battois Spring/Summer 2014 collection

www.arnoldoebattois.com

ART, FASHION, CREATIVITY & SARTORIALISM: THE EMOTIONAL TALE BY MARKO MATYSIK

Marko Matisyk, photo by Philip Suddick
Marko Matisyk, photo by Philip Suddick

Emotions, a powerful creative energy, humility, genius, modesty and positivity, a generous and bright personality shines in Marko Matysik, special individual and smashing eclectic creative with whom I was pleased of talking about, amazed and happy of sharing ideas about fashion, creativity and contemporary times. To talk about Marko and introducing him and the works he make properly it’s not so easy, being Marko a volcano of creativity, arisen since his childhood – age when he passed the time making paper princesses as gift to his mother’s friends, spent travelling around the world with his Anglo-German hotelier parents and absorbing the minutiae of jet-set life. Later he graduated with honors at the London St. Martin’s school of Art and started dressing princesses, working at the Victor Edelstein atelier ( the preferred couturier of Diana, the Princess of Wales). Then he established his own label “Marko Matysik” in 1995, working in Paris and London in the realm which is his passion, the couture and continuing  working for many private haute couture clients internationally under this label – including the making wedding dress for Tamara Beckwith and an accessories collection presented every season in Paris at Colette, belts being something which goes beyond belts, about whose I recently talked, created by joining antique ribbons, fabrics and buckles from the 15th to 18th century, giving rise to luxury creations collected by personas as Madonna, Donatella Versace, Karl Lagerfeld and Daphne Guinness.

Marko Matysik and the reportage he made featuring in Vogue China October 2005 issue
Marko Matysik and the reportage he made featuring in Vogue China October 2005 issue

Luxury, a luxury idea which is quite far away from the idea of luxury embodied in most of luxury brands’ commercials and in their logos impressed on the items they made, it’s the genuine idea of luxury which is the one developed through his work, connected to the idea of uniqueness, timeless elegance and style, embodies a refined craftsmanship and precious materials and successfully makes concrete creativity under the sign of its free expression and experimentation. In fact art is the main feature of Marko’s creative process in the realm of fashion as well as in other realms connected to that he explores as fashion consulting (for companies as Belmacz, Boudicca, Krizia, and also as creative director for Marie-Helen de Taillac) styling, fashion illustration, and fashion journalism (as editor in chief for Big Show, contributing fashion editor for World of Interiors, Drama and Vogue worldwide magazine, including a monthly page in Vogue Japan and Vogue China) by using of an emotional approach and care for detail. That is the exploration of the same field, the haute couture and luxury by using another medium and holding the same artistic approach.

Marko Matysik and the illustrations he made featuring in Vogue China April 2006 issue
Marko Matysik and the illustrations he made featuring in Vogue China April 2006 issue

That is what shines in the series of painting he made, works commissioned by Vogue China, turned into illustrations featuring along with photographs and interviews he made in an editorial on couture fashion week, genuine artworks that were exhibited by the London Fashion Illustration Gallery,  an agency owned by William Lyng ( Marko’s agent) at the London Mayor Gallery (in 22A Cork Street). A smashing creative energy and the beauty of an precious individual who celebrates and successfully makes concrete fashion and elegance as an artwork it is what is embodied in the following interview, arisen from a marvelous conversation with Marko Matysik where he generously talked about himself, telling about the core of is work, its creative path and forthcoming projects.

Christian Lacroix seen by Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

How did you start working in the realm of fashion?

“Since I was a child, at age of 4 I was obsessed with princesses since I was a child, at age of 4, I designed dresses having bows, I loved everything which shined. One day a friend of my mother who saw my sketches told me: “you will become and you will make my dresses”, but I still wasn’t conscious of that, of what I would wanted to do when I would has been older. I was fascinated by suggestions, colors when I go out, walking on the street, I looked at the shops windows and I set up a shop window for a boutique at the age of 11-12, a fantastic experience I continued doing for two years. Later, I showed at the age of 13 my sketch book to Manfred Schneider, a very famous couturier in Munich, I landed my first job as design assistant and I became a luxury addict. Then I studied at the London St. Martin’s School of Art and after I graduated I started working for Victor Edelstein and later I created my own brand.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Beyond that I started working in the realm of fashion journalism and illustration. That has happened for random. Since I ended the St. Martin’s, a friend of mine I saw during a party, a fashion journalist told me he had to cover fashion week, go to the fashion shows, make a reportage and he didn’t feel like doing that, therefore I told him: don’t worry, if you want I can do that. Thus all that started. Having already my clients I felt myself like outside reality, therefore that has been a successful chance for me to enter into the reality. Resulting also from that I made illustrations for Vogue”.

Marko Matysik on Vogue China
Marko Matysik on Vogue China

What is the leitmotiv – if there is a leitmotiv or rather an element – joining your different creative expression you make concrete as illustrator, fashion writer and fashion designer?

“It’s the creativity, the freedom of experiment creativity without limits. That is one of the reasons for which I love the realm of haute couture. Here I am not responsible for a huge office, a huge staff, I don’t deal with a big pr office, I have less limits in terms of creativity and designing. Nevertheless I never desired getting a huge studio, I prefer being selfish in this sense and standing alone, the collaboration is important, but I prefer – it’s a privilege – working by myself, as I don’t want being responsible to manage a big team. Thus it has also happened with the work which has commissioned to me by Vogue China concerning the haute couture fashion week. It has been a privilege for me after the hectic rhythm of haute couture fashion week and its magic working for a month on the paintings and spending my time at the Nicholas Bernstein’s studio – placed in the area of Hammersmith – with whom I collaborated where he would painted then I would painted on top or viceversa. He – who hasn’t a classical background –  inspired very much my work which has been something spiritual, to paint has been a kind of escapism, having spent one month alone painting, a medium which is more different than drawing. To use oil on canvas, instead of drawing, also reaches the spread of color in the studio where you work, as the Nicholas’ studio which is full of color spread in the room. Anyway to paint has emphasized the magic atmosphere of haute couture fashion show I had the privilege of seeing. An escapism which make you feel safe. There is a big magic and creativity in the dream-provoking couture and also in its backstage. In fact the backstage is what I cover in my reportages, as I like to look at a garment, touch it, feel how it’s a dress, the movement it makes and it is a magic and the sound a fabric makes as the paper taffeta is an emotion. I consider myself as a privileged one, having the chance of seeing periodically my little fashion family and being able of enjoying all that.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Coming back to the theme of fashion, I am focused on the field of couture and luxury, as this realm has many potentialities in the free creative expression and experimentation, instead the ready-to-wear reaches more compromises in order to create something which pleases to more people. And it’s a big pressure for me having more people to satisfy, I have my commissions that make all that more spontaneous, fun and free, having just only two or three women on mind, one client to satisfy who is happy for what I make and makes me happy for what I make.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Concerning my collection of belts – as the silver chatelaine, which is available at giftlab.com -, it has arisen spontaneously, it is also connected to something emotional, though is the result of a detailed search for textiles, materials and ancient and contemporary decorating elements in the realm of belts. It’s an emotional experiences as it arises from going out and visiting Carol Graves Johnson, specialized in belts and owner of company Cingular, going to her house which is on the other bank of Thames. That is connected to something emotional, the joy which arises from seeing Carol and working together on the belts.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Considering the leitmotiv of my work and its designing process, the main purpose is to give a deep, meaningful dimension, something having a soul, it’s not only about to give something which is new, it’ s all about that, it’s about many global influences and it’s about it’s all about being part of this mélange of periods of times and of details. I am incredibly curious, I research on the background of my project to get the happier result. I am more connected to the art environment and I think the most enjoyable thing is to inspire others. Instead thinking about what I create the leitmotiv is being feel appeal considered I tend to specialize in items for people that already have everything”.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

What are the forthcoming projects you are working on?

“I am art directing a video, styling two shoots, making an Haute Couture soft trouser suit with coat and blouse and starting up super chic accessories collection (gloves, hats and other items) created by upcycling and I am making the monthly diary page for Vogue Japan”.

ARTE, MODA, CREATIVITÀ & SARTORIALITÀ: IL RACCONTO EMOZIONALE DI MARKO MATYSIK

Marko Matysik, photo by Philip Suddick
Marko Matysik, photo by Philip Suddick

Emozioni, passione, una ponderosa energia creativa, umiltà, genialità, modestia e positività, una generosa e brillante personalità splende in Marko Matysik, speciale individualità e formidabile, eclettico creativo con cui sono stata lieta di parlare, piacevolmente sorpresa e felice di condividere idee in tema di moda, creatività e contemporaneità. Parlare di Marko e presentare lui ed il suoi lavori in modo appropriato non è facile, essendo Marko un vulcano di creatività, nata sin dall’ infanzia, epoca in cui passava il tempo a fare principesse di carta da regalare alle amiche della madre, trascorsa viaggiando per il mondo con i suoi genitori, albergatori anglo-americani e assorbendo le minuzie della vita del jet-set. Successivamente si è diplomato con lode presso la St. Martin’s school of Art di Londra ed ha cominciato a vestire le principesse, lavorando all’ atelier Victor Edelstein (il couturier preferito di Diana, la Princesss del Galles). Ha poi creato il proprio marchio “Marko Matysik” nel 1995, lavorando a Parigi e Londra nell’ ambito che è la sua passione, l’ alta moda e continuando a lavorare internazionalmente con la sua etichetta per plurimi clienti privati di altamoda – che include la realizzazione dell’ abito da sposa per Tamara Beckwith and una collezione di accessori presentata ogni stagione a Parigi da Colette, cinture che sono qualcosa che va oltre le cinture, di cui ho recentemente parlato, create unendo nastri antichi, tessuti e fibbie dal 15° al 18° secolo, dando vita a creazioni di lusso, collezionate da personaggi quali Madonna, Donatella Versace, Karl Lagerfeld e Daphne Guinness.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Il lusso, un idea di lusso che è ben lungi dall’ idea di lusso racchiusa nelle pubblicità dei brand di lusso e nei loro loghi impressi nei capi da loro realizzati, è l’ autentica idea del lusso che è quella consolidata attraverso la sua opera, connessa all’ idea di unicità, eleganza e stile senza tempo, racchiude in sé una raffinata artigianalità e preziosi materiali e concretizza felicemente la creatività all’ insegna di una libera espressione e sperimentazione. Infatti l’ arte è il tratto principale dell’ processo creativo di Marko nell’ ambito della moda come anche in altri ambiti ad essa connessi che esplora nelle vesti di consulente di moda (per aziende quali Belmacz, Boudicca, Krizia ed anche nelle vesti di direttore creativo per Marie-Helen de Taillac) styling, illustrazione e giornalismo di moda (quale direttore editoriale di Big Show, contributing fashion editor per World of Interiors, Drama ed i Vogue magazines di tutto il mondo, che comprende una pagina mensile su Vogue Japan e Vogue China) avvalendosi di un approccio emozionale e della cura per il dettaglio. È l’ esplorazione del medesimo ambito, l’ alta moda e il lusso mediante l’ uso di un altro mezzo di comunicazione e conservando il medesimo approccio artistico.

Marko Matysik on Vogue China
Marko Matysik on Vogue China

Ciò è quel che splende bella serie di dipinti da lui realizzati, lavori commissionati da Vogue China, trasformati in illustrazioni che sono protagoniste unitamente a fotografie ed interviste da lui realizzate di un editoriale sulla settimana dell’ alta moda, autentiche opere d’ arte che sono state esposte dalla Fashion Illustration Gallery di Londra , agenzia di proprietà di William Lyng ( l’ agente di Marko) resso la Mayor Gallery (in 22A Cork Street) di Londra. Una formidabile energia creativa e la bellezza di una preziosa individualità che celebra e concretizza felicemente la moda ed eleganza quale opera d’ arte è quel che è racchiuso nella intervista che segue, nata da una meravigliosa conversazione con Marko Matysik in cui si è generosamente raccontato, parlando del nucleo centrale della sua opera, del suo iter creativo e dei progetti futuri.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Come hai iniziato a lavorare nell’ ambito della moda?

“Da bambino, all’ età di quattro anni ero ossessionato dalle principesse, disegnavo vestiti con i fiocchi, amavo tutto ciò che brillava. Un giorno un’ amica di mia madre che ha visto i miei disegni mi ha detto: “diventerai couturier e mi farai i vestiti”, ancora però non ero consapevole di ciò che avrei voluto fare da grande. Ero affascinato dalle suggestioni, dai colori, quando uscivo per strada osservavo le vetrine dei negozi e all’ età di undici-dodici anni ho allestito una vetrina per una boutique, una esperienza fantastica che ho fatto per circa due anni. In seguito all’ età di tredici anni ho mostrato il mio libro di schizzi a Manfred Schneider, un couturier molto famoso a Monaco, ho avuto il mio primo lavoro avuto il mio primo lavoro nelle vesti di design assistant e sono divenuto un patito del lusso. Ho poi studiato alla St. Martin’s School of Art di Londra e non appena mi sono diplomato ho iniziato a lavorare per Victor Edelstein e ho creato il mio brand.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Oltre a ciò ho iniziato a lavorare nell’ ambito del giornalismo di moda e nell’ illustrazione. Ciò è avvenuto casualmente. Una volta conclusa la St. Martin’s un mio amico incontrato in occasione di un party, un giornalista di moda, mi diceva che doveva effettuare un reportage della fashion week, andare alle sfilate, fare un reportage e non ne aveva per nulla voglia, sicché gli ho detto: non preoccuparti se vuoi potrei farlo io. Così è cominciato tutto ciò”. Avendo già i miei clienti mi sentivo avulso dalla realtà, pertanto questa per me è stata una felice occasione per entrare nella realtà. Anche in ragione di ciò ho realizzato le illustrazioni per Vogue”.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Qual è il leitmotiv – se esiste un leitmotiv o meglio un elemento – che accomuna la tua diversa espressione creativa che concretizzi nelle vesti di illustratore, giornalista di moda e fashion designer?

“E’ la creatività, la libertà di sperimentare la creatività senza limiti. Questa è una delle ragioni per cui amo l’ ambito dell’ alta moda. Ivi non sono responsabile di un grande ufficio, un grande staff, non ho a che fare con un grande ufficio di pubbliche relazioni, ho meno limitazioni in termini di creatività e progettazione. Peraltro non ho mai desiderato disporre di un ampio studio, preferisco essere egoista in questo senso e bastare a me stesso, la collaborazione è importante, ma preferisco – è un privilegio – operare da solo non volendo essere responsabile di gestire un grande team. Così è accaduto anche con il lavoro a me commissionato da Vogue China inerente la settimana dell’ alta moda. Dopo il ritmo frenetico della settimana dell’ alta moda e la sua magia è stato un privilegio per me, lavorare per un mese ai dipinti e passare il mio tempo presso lo studio – ubicato nei dintorni di Hammersmith – dell’ artista Nicholas Bernstein con cui ho collaborato precedentemente dipingendo prima l’ uno e poi l’ altro a vicenda. Costui – che non ha un background classico – ha ispirato molto il mio lavoro che è stato qualcosa di spirituale, dipinge è stato una sorta di escapismo, avendo passato un mese da solo a dipingere, una modalità ben diversa dal disegnare. Usare l’ olio su tela, diversamente dal disegno, implica la dispersione del colore anche nello studio in cui lavori, come lo studio di Nicholas, pieno di colore sparso per gli ambienti. Peraltro dipingere ha enfatizzato la magica atmosfera delle sfilate di alta moda che ho avuto il privilegio di vedere. Un escapismo che fa sentire al sicuro. C’è grande magia e creatività nella couture che provoca il sogno e anche nel suo backstage. Infatti il backstage è l’ ambito che documento nei miei reportage, poiché mi piace vedere un capo, toccarlo, sentire come è un abito, il movimento che esso fa ed è di per sé una magia ed il il suono che fa un tessuto quale il taffetà ad effetto carta è un emozione. Mi considero un privilegiato, avendo la possibilità di incontrare la mia piccola famiglia della moda periodicamente e potere apprezzare tutto ciò.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Tornando alla moda, sono concentrato sul settore della couture e del lusso, poiché questo ambito ha maggiori potenzialità di libera espressione creativa e sperimentazione, mentre con il pret â porter si devono fare maggiori compromessi al fine di creare qualcosa che piaccia a più persone. E per me è una grande pressione avere più persone da soddisfare, ho le mie commissioni che rendono tutto ciò più spontaneo divertente e libero, avendo soltanto due, tre donne in testa, una cliente da soddisfare che è felice di ciò che faccio e rende felice me per ciò che faccio.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Riguardo alla mia collezione di cinture  – quali la silver chatelaine che è disponibile su giftlab.com – è nata spontaneamente, anche essa è legata a qualcosa di emozionale, pur essendo frutto di una ricerca dettagliata di tessuti, materiali ed elementi di decoro antichi e recenti in materia di cinture. È un esperienza emozionale, poiché nasce dall’ uscire e far visita a Carol Graves Johnson, specialista di cinture e proprietaria dell’ azienda Cingular, andando a casa sua che si trova dall’ altra parte della riva del Tamigi. Ciò è connesso a qualcosa di emozionale, alla gioia di vedere Carol e insieme lavorare alle cinture.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Considerando il leitmotiv del mio lavoro e la sua progettazione, la principale finalità è offrire una dimensione profonda, densa di significato, qualcosa che abbia un anima, non è soltanto offrire qualcosa che sia nuovo, è ciò su cui esso verte, è una questione di molteplici influenze globali e dell’ essere parte di questo mélange di epoche e di dettagli. Sono incredibilmente curioso, faccio ricerche considerando il background del mio progetto al fine di ottenere il risultato più felice. Sono più connesso all’ ambiente dell’ arte e ritengo che la cosa più gradevole sia ispirare gli altri. Pensando invece ciò che creo il leitmotiv sono l’ essere sostenibile, la sensazione di appeal, considerando che tendo a specializzarmi in oggetti per gente che ha già tutto”.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik

Quali sono i progetti futuri a cui stai lavorando?

“Sto curando la direzione artistica di un video, lo styling per due servizi fotografici, realizzando un completo di alta moda composto di morbidi pantaloni, cappotto e camicia e avviando una collezione super chic di accessori creati mediante surciclo (guanti, cappelli e altro) e lavorando alla mie cronache sulla pagina mensile di Vogue Japan“.

Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik
Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill
Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill
Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill
Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill
Marko Matysik
the silver chatelaine by Marko Matysik, available at Giftlab.com

 

THE INTERNATIONAL FASHION SHOWCASE 2013, SERBIA SHOW-ROOM IN LONDON

Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja

The rebellious force of Serbian fashion featuring in the Belgrade Fashion Week and its more promising creatives as Ivana Pilja along with Ana Ljubinković and George Styler will feature in the International Fashion Showcase 2013, Serbia Show-room, event organized by the British Fashion Council, which will coincide with the latest edition of London Fashion Week and will be held from 13th to 23rd February 2013 in London at the Serbian House (7 Dering Street, Myfair). Here the works by the visionary fashion designers, the original designs they made will be showcased and incorporated in a unique framework made by the illustrator Vesna Pesic. The exhibition – event successfully evidencing the glocal, global and local, approach of a brilliant institution as the British Fashion Council in showcasing, promoting and concretely supporting the emerging creativity, something which should be developed also in other countries, following this way  – will be accompanied by a special edition of FAAR magazine.

LA INTERNATIONAL FASHION SHOWCASE 2013, LO SHOW-ROOM DELLA SERBIA A LONDRA

Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja

La forza eversiva della moda serba, protagonista della Belgrade Fashion Week ed i suoi creativi più promettenti quali Ivana Pilja unitamente ad Ana Ljubinković e George Styler saranno protagonisti della International Fashion Showcase 2013, lo Show-room della Serbia, evento organizzato dal British Fashion Council, che coinciderà con l’ ultima edizione della  London Fashion Week e si terrà dal 13 al 23febbraio 2013 a Londra presso la Serbian House (7 Dering Street, Myfair). Ivi Ie opere dei visionari fashion designers, le originali creazioni da loro realizzate saranno esposte e incorporate in una unica cornice, realizzata dall’ illustratrice Vesna Pesic. La mostra – evento che dimostra l’ approccio glocal, globale e locale, di una brillante istituzione quale il British Fashion Council nell’ esporre, promuovere e sostenere concretamente la creatività emergente, qualcosa che dovrebbe essere consolidato, seguendo questa via anche in altri paesi – sarà accompagnata da una edizione speciale del magazine FAAR.

Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja
Ivana Pilja

www.britishfashioncouncil.com

THE ELEGANCE SEEN BY LUELLA

Nunzia Garoffolo by Luella
Nunzia Garoffolo by Luella

Luella Rigaud is a bright French fashion designer and illustrator depicting elegance, style and reinterpreting yesterday and today fashion of whose work – featuring also me – I am pleased to showcase and tell more during the forthcoming days, talking about her forthcoming Paris exhibition at the celebrated concept store of Bastien De Almeida.

L’ ELEGANZA VISTA DA LUELLA

Sainte Rita by Luella
Sainte Rita by Luella

Luella Rigaud è una brillante fashion designer e illustratrice francese che ritrae l’ eleganza, lo stile e reinterpreta la moda di ieri e oggi la cui opera – di cui sono anche protagonista – sono lieta di esporre e parlare meglio nei prossimi giorni, raccontando della sua prossima mostra parigina presso il celebre concept store di Bastien De Almeida.

Cova by Luella
Cova by Luella
Twiggy by Luella
Twiggy by Luella
Lula by Luella
Lula by Luella
Luella
Luella
Luella
Luella
Luella
Luella
Luella
Luella

http://bastiendealmeida.com

“TALK IN IED”: IRIS VAN HERPEN IN ROME AT MAXXI B.A.S.E.

Federico Poletti, Tommaso Basilio and Iris Van Herpen

The renowned Rome fashion school European Design Institute(IED) recently held at the Maxxi B.A.S.E. “Talk in IED”, a meeting – included in smashing series of workshops organized to train the students – moderated by the journalist Federico Poletti and the professor Tommaso Basilio, featuring the young Netherlander high fashion designer Iris Van Herpen and come before by the screening of shortfilm directed by Joost Vandebrug . Here the designer, shy and hesitant, woman – embodying a leitmotiv of many creatives and artists who are able to feel and make, but rarely to explain properly and fully ideas -, answered to my question (“to which extent she was influenced by the idea of grotesque as unconventional standard of beauty”, a “difficult question” as the creative said, giving rise to a nice interaction and asking me immediately for further references concerning the grotesque, marvelously depicted by the works of Aubrey Beardsley, patterns I think that are evoked in an avant-garde way by her) and many other ones, talking about her work, based essentially on an artistic approach made of thought and intuition – bright evidence of the creative power of chaos, as concept opposing to the order and organization of work – as well as the search for materials that often, but not only are a source of inspiration. A successful chance for students and enthusiasts to discover and enjoying an emerging talent of high fashion – who debuts on Fall, presenting her first ready-to-wear collection,  further step of her creative paht towards the synthesis of concept I wish her of making at best – as well as to think about fashion culture and culture in fashion, ancient connection and precious source which sometimes is taken for granted.

“TALK IN IED”: IRIS VAN HERPEN A ROMA AL MAXXI B.A.S.E.    

Iris Van Herpen

La rinomata scuola di moda di Roma Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) ha recentemente tenuto presso il Maxxi B.A.S.E. “Talk in IED”, un incontro – incluso nella formidabile serie di workshops organizzati per formare gli studenti – moderato dal giornalista Federico Poletti e il docente Tommaso Basilio di cui é stata protagonista la giovane designer di alta moda Iris Van Herpen e preceduto dal fashion film diretto da Joost Vandebrug. Ivi la creativa, donna timida ed esitante – che racchiude in sé un leitmotiv di creativi ed artisti che sovente hanno la capacità di sentire e fare, ma raramente di esprimere idee in modo appropriato e dettagliato – ha risposto alla mia domanda (“in che misura è stata influenzata dall’ idea del grottesco quale standard anticonvenzionale di bellezza?”, una “domanda difficile”, come ha detto la giovane creativa, dando vita a una simpatica interazione e chiedendo immediatamente a me ulteriori riferimenti in merito al grottesco, meravigliosamente dipinto dalle opere di Aubrey Beardsley, motivi che ritengo siano da lei evocati in una foggia avveniristica) come anche a molte altre, parlando del suo lavoro che si basa essenzialmente su un approccio artistico fatto di pensiero e intuizione – brillante concretizzazione del potere creativo del caos quale idea contrapposta all’ ordine e organizzazione del lavoro – come anche di ricerca dei materiali che sovente, ma non unicamente sono una fonte di ispirazione. Una felice occasione per studenti ed entusiasti per scoprire e apprezzare un emergente talento dell’ alta moda – che debutta in autunno presentando la sua prima collezione di prêt-à porter, passo ulteriore del suo percorso creativo verso la sintesi del concept che le auguro di realizzare al meglio -, come anche per riflettere sulla cultura della moda e la cultura nella moda, antico legame e preziosa risorsa che talvolta é data per scontata.

Iris Van Herpen
Iris van Herpen

www.ied.it

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ILARIA VENTURINI FENDI!

Ilaria Venturini Fendi and me during the past edition of Floracult

The birthday of my darling friend Ilaria Venturini Fendi, pioneer designer, creator of ethical fashion brand Carmina Campus, successful chance to send her my warmest happy birthday wishes as well as to talk of the third edition of Floracult, event celebrating the nature and its culture she created which will be held from 27th to 29th April 2012 in the Rome countryside at the suggestive area of I Casali del Pino, featuring talks with experts – as Paolo Pejrone, Giuppi Pietromarchi, Mario Margheriti, Alberto Abruzzese, Valentina Tanni, Massimo Pezzella, Livio de Santoli, Domenico Straface, Elvira Imbellone, Federico Fazzuoli, Fabio Brescacin, Carlo Mascioli, Marco Baudino, Paolo Sambo, Isabella Dalla Ragione, Antonio Dal Monte, Renato Pavia Serena Dandini and the nice architect Pietro Dottor -, courses, guided tours, meeting as the national meeting of succulent plantas, exhibitions of artists as Maria Grazia Pontorno – who made “Axis”, a site specific video installation for the event, featuring an cork oak placed close to an Etrurian arch, silent witnesses of past -, “Re-watering”, the hydroponic installation made by Studio Mobile, the room of amphibians and reptiles curated by Animalmovie of Alessandro Rosati and the performance under the sign of sustainability by the Voci nel Deserto in order to increase the consciousness and respect for environment, the issues connected to that and a lifestyle being closer to the nature. A laudable initiative, not to be missed happening to rediscover and enjoy the nature.

BUON COMPLEANNO A ILARIA VENTURINI FENDI!

A rose at Floracult

Il compleanno della mia cara amica Ilaria Venturini Fendi, pionieristica designer, creatrice del brand di moda Carmina Campus, felice occasione per farle i miei affettuosi auguri di buon compleanno come anche per parlare della terza edizione di Floracult, evento che celebra la natura e la sua cultura da lei creato che si terrà dal 27 al 29 aprile 2012 nella campagna romana presso la suggestiva area de I Casali del Pino, di cui saranno protagonisti talks con experti – quali Paolo Pejrone, Giuppi Pietromarchi, Mario Margheriti, Alberto Abruzzese, Valentina Tanni, Massimo Pezzella, Livio de Santoli, Domenico Straface, Elvira Imbellone, Federico Fazzuoli, Fabio Brescacin, Carlo Mascioli, Marco Baudino, Paolo Sambo, Isabella Dalla Ragione, Antonio Dal Monte, Renato PaviaSerena Dandini ed il simpatico architetto Pietro Dottor -, corsi, visite guidate, convegni quali il congresso nazionale delle piante grasse, mostre di artisti quali Maria Grazia Pontorno – che ha realizzato “Axis”, una video installazione site specific per l’ evento di cui è protagonista una quercia da sughero, ubicata vicino a un arco etrusco, silente testimone del passato -, “Re-watering”, la installazione idroponica realizzata da Studio Mobile, la stanza degli anfibi e dei rettili curata da Animalmovie di Alessandro Rosati e la performance all’ insegna della sostenibilità di Voci nel Deserto al fine di accrescere la consapevolezza e il rispetto per l’ ambiente, le problematiche ad esso collegate ed uno stile di vita più vicino alla natura. Una lodevole iniziativa, evento imperdibile per riscoprire e apprezzare la natura.

flowers at Floracult
Fleur-de-lis at Floracult
Floracult
Floracult
Carmina Campus

http://vimeo.com/21353184

www.floracult.com

THE SPRING TEA PARTY/SAMPLE SALE FEATURING LA CHINA LOCA & NATHALIE KRAYNINA

La China Loca, photo by Liz Liguori

The New York millinery brand La China Loca, created by the designer Anastasia Andino teamed with the designer Nathalie Kraynina who featured along with her in a Brooklyn fashion event, the Williamsburg fashion week, a successful creative affinity of whose results under the sign of elegance and craftsmanship will be exhibited during the Spring tea party/sample sale, an event which will be held on 31st March 2012 in New York at the La China Loca studio from the 12 pm to 7 pm385 South 5th St. – where the creations will be available for purchase. A not to be missed happening to enjoy the work of two bright creatives.

IL TEA PARTY/SAMPLE SALE DI PRIMAVERA CON LA CHINA LOCA & NATHALIE KRAYNINA

La China Loca, photo by Gothic Hangman

Il brand newyorkese di cappelli La China Loca, creato dalla designer Anastasia Andino ha collaborato con la designer Nathalie Kraynina protagonista con lei di un evento di moda di Brooklyn, la Williamsburg fashion week, una felice affinità creativa i cui risultati all’ insegna dell’ eleganza e artigianalità saranno esposti in 9occasione del tea party/sample sale di primavera, evento che si terrà 31 marzo 2012 a New York presso lo studio di La China Loca dalle 12:00 alle ore 19:00385 South 5th St. – in cui le creazioni saranno disponibili alla vendita. Un evento imperdibile per apprezzare l’ opera di due brillanti creativi.

La China Loca, photo by Gothic Hangman
La China Loca, photo by Liz Liguori

www.lachinaloca.com

www.nathaliekraynina.com

FASHION AND TALENT-SCOUTING: THE PROJECT OF NOT JUST A LABEL AT PITTI TOUCH! NEOZONE CLOUDINE

Eleanor Amoroso

Stefan Siegel, creator of celebrated virtual platform Not Just A Label promoting emerging designers featured in the latest edition of trade-show event  Pitti Touch! Neozone Cloudine – which was held in Milan at the NHow Hotel – with a site-specific project, chose eight smashing designers appearing in Not Just A Label – Angela Bang, Eleanor Amoroso, Fanny and JessyHowitzweissbach(bright German designers duo), Juliaandben, Pedro Pedro, Reality Studio, Veronica B. Vallenes – to showcase their Spring/Summer 2012 collections and have the chance to connect with market and buyers. A laudable partnership, joining the pioneer approach as genuine talent scout of a virtual platform to an Institution as Pitti, successfully making concrete a continuous, innovative search in the realm of contemporary fashion.

MODA E TALENT-SCOUTING: IL PROGETTO DI NOT JUST A LABEL AL PITTI TOUCH! NEOZONE CLOUDINE

Eleanor Amoroso Spring/Summer 2012

 Stefan Siegel, creatore della celebre piattaforma virtuale Not Just A Label che promuove designer emergenti è stato protagonista dell’ ultima edizione dell’evento fieristico Pitti Touch! Neozone Cloudine – che si é tenuto a Milano presso il NHow Hotel – con un progetto  site specific project, ha scelto otto formitabili designer che appaiono in Not Just A Label – Angela Bang, Eleanor Amoroso, Fanny and Jessy, Howitzweissbach(brillante duo di designer tedeschi), Juliaandben, Pedro Pedro, Reality Studio, Veronica B. Vallenes – per esporre le loro collezioni primavera/estate 2012 ed avere la possibilità di entrare in contatto con il mercato ed i buyer. Una lodevole partnership che unisce il pionieristico approccio da talent-scout di una piattaforma virtuale ad una Istituzione quale Pitti che concretizza felicemente una continua, ricerca innovativa nell’ambito della moda contemporanea.

Eleanor Amoroso Spring/Summer 2012
Eleanor Amoroso Spring/Summer 2012
Pedro Pedro Spring/Summer 2012
Pedro Pedro Spring/Summer 2012
Pedro Pedro Spring/Summer 2012
Pedro Pedro Spring/Summer 2012
Pedro Pedro Spring/Summer 2012
Pedro Pedro Spring/Summer 2012
Julia and Ben Spring/Summer 2012
Julia and Ben Spring/Summer 2012
Fanny & Jessy Spring/Summer 2012
Fanny & Jessy Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012 collection
Howittzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012
Howitzweissbach Spring/Summer 2012

www.pittimmagine.com

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑